Theme
9:14pm August 24, 2013

The brief moment of seeing Eric sitting in the chair on the top of the mountain could be more important than I initially thought (after reeling from anger at various issues in the season finale).
Those who seek solace in the mountain seek an insight, a closeness to spiritual force (or God). They come down from the mountain changed. It is signified by a journey to the top of the mountain as it is an arduous but intentional journey, not a chance encounter, it takes time and it is marked by openness to what and who is around a person, it involves no distractions. 
Two most famous journeys to the mountain in the Bible are: Moses’s journey to the Mount Sinai to receive the Law of God (Commandments, Decalogue) and Jesus’s journey to the mountain (Mount of Transfiguration) with Peter, James and John, an event that signals Jesus’s transformation to Son of God. In both instances these men were removed from crowds of people and received a message from God. Moses was asked to wait (40 days and 40 nights). Humbled by this experience, learning patience and realising he was not in control he moved closer to God. And when he climbed back down to the people, he carried with him the stone tablets that contained the laws to live by, all that the people needed to know in faith.
In Christian teachings, the Transfiguration is a pivotal moment, and the setting on the mountain is presented as the point where human nature meets God: the meeting place for the temporal and the eternal, with Jesus himself as the connecting point, acting as the bridge between heaven and earth.  Jesus is transfigured (or metamorphosed) and becomes radiant upon a mountain.
Jesus went to the mountain top. “He took Peter and James and John and led them up a high mountain, by themselves.” (Matt 17:1). The disciples were weary as they started their trip up the mountain with Jesus. They were exhausted by the non-stop demands of the crowds. Up high, away from the crowds, peace and quiet. Exhausted, the disciples can barely keep their eyes open. But before sleep overtakes them, something remarkable happens. The disciples are startled awake by a sudden flash of radiance and the disciples behold the glory of God. And then, suddenly Jesus is not alone, surrounded by the radiance, he is accompanied by two men: Moses and Elijah (Matt. 17:2-3). Moses and Elijah are two of Israel’s greatest heroes. Moses represents the Law and Elijah the prophets. Both Moses and Elijah were called to lead God’s people in a new direction. Jesus shares this prophetic call with them. In Moses, Elijah, and Jesus, the disciples catch a glimpse of life in the reign of God to come. God calls out: “This is my beloved son with whom I am well pleased,” (Matt. 17:5). “Listen to him!” The disciples then fall to the ground in fear, but Jesus approaches and touches them, telling them not to be afraid. When the disciples look up, they no longer see Elijah or Moses. When Jesus and the three apostles are going back down the mountain, Jesus tells them to not tell anyone “the things they had seen” until the “Son of Man" has risen from the dead. The apostles are described as questioning among themselves as to what Jesus meant by “risen from the dead”.
Martin Luther King Jr. in his famous speech told us all about his mountaintop experience:
'We've got some difficult days ahead. But it really doesn't matter with me now, because I've been to the mountaintop.
And I don’t mind.
Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. Longevity has its place. But I’m not concerned about that now. I just want to do God’s will. And He’s allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I’ve looked over. And I’ve seen the Promised Land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the promised land!
And so I’m happy, tonight. I’m not worried about anything. I’m not fearing any man! Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord!’ (I have a dream speech, Aug. 28, 1963).
Maybe there is a specific reason why Eric seeks the mountaintop and why he is isolated (short-term) from the creepy new Bon Temps. If we take into account three people mentioned above, they signify a profound change for the rest of the people and I would like to see Eric as a force that returns to Bon Temps to deliver such a change (it will not come from within, not with what we can see: Bill directing this town like a puppeteer). Remember, Eric is a son of Godric and has exposed Bill before; Bill is a false prophet, a quasi saviour, a known traitor and liar. The only force that can annihilate Bill is Eric.
In 5.03 we witness Eric and Bill meeting for the first time: ‘Bill: Who are you? Eric: Eric Northman. But to you, the true death.’
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ten_Commandments
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transfiguration_of_Jesus
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_of_the_Transfiguration

The brief moment of seeing Eric sitting in the chair on the top of the mountain could be more important than I initially thought (after reeling from anger at various issues in the season finale).

Those who seek solace in the mountain seek an insight, a closeness to spiritual force (or God). They come down from the mountain changed. It is signified by a journey to the top of the mountain as it is an arduous but intentional journey, not a chance encounter, it takes time and it is marked by openness to what and who is around a person, it involves no distractions.

Two most famous journeys to the mountain in the Bible are: Moses’s journey to the Mount Sinai to receive the Law of God (Commandments, Decalogue) and Jesus’s journey to the mountain (Mount of Transfiguration) with Peter, James and John, an event that signals Jesus’s transformation to Son of God. In both instances these men were removed from crowds of people and received a message from God. Moses was asked to wait (40 days and 40 nights). Humbled by this experience, learning patience and realising he was not in control he moved closer to God. And when he climbed back down to the people, he carried with him the stone tablets that contained the laws to live by, all that the people needed to know in faith.

In Christian teachings, the Transfiguration is a pivotal moment, and the setting on the mountain is presented as the point where human nature meets God: the meeting place for the temporal and the eternal, with Jesus himself as the connecting point, acting as the bridge between heaven and earth.  Jesus is transfigured (or metamorphosed) and becomes radiant upon a mountain.

Jesus went to the mountain top. “He took Peter and James and John and led them up a high mountain, by themselves.” (Matt 17:1). The disciples were weary as they started their trip up the mountain with Jesus. They were exhausted by the non-stop demands of the crowds. Up high, away from the crowds, peace and quiet. Exhausted, the disciples can barely keep their eyes open. But before sleep overtakes them, something remarkable happens. The disciples are startled awake by a sudden flash of radiance and the disciples behold the glory of God. And then, suddenly Jesus is not alone, surrounded by the radiance, he is accompanied by two men: Moses and Elijah (Matt. 17:2-3). Moses and Elijah are two of Israel’s greatest heroes. Moses represents the Law and Elijah the prophets. Both Moses and Elijah were called to lead God’s people in a new direction. Jesus shares this prophetic call with them. In Moses, Elijah, and Jesus, the disciples catch a glimpse of life in the reign of God to come. God calls out: “This is my beloved son with whom I am well pleased,” (Matt. 17:5). “Listen to him!” The disciples then fall to the ground in fear, but Jesus approaches and touches them, telling them not to be afraid. When the disciples look up, they no longer see Elijah or Moses. When Jesus and the three apostles are going back down the mountain, Jesus tells them to not tell anyone “the things they had seen” until the “Son of Man" has risen from the dead. The apostles are described as questioning among themselves as to what Jesus meant by “risen from the dead”.

Martin Luther King Jr. in his famous speech told us all about his mountaintop experience:

'We've got some difficult days ahead. But it really doesn't matter with me now, because I've been to the mountaintop.

And I don’t mind.

Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. Longevity has its place. But I’m not concerned about that now. I just want to do God’s will. And He’s allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I’ve looked over. And I’ve seen the Promised Land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the promised land!

And so I’m happy, tonight. I’m not worried about anything. I’m not fearing any man! Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord!’ (I have a dream speech, Aug. 28, 1963).

Maybe there is a specific reason why Eric seeks the mountaintop and why he is isolated (short-term) from the creepy new Bon Temps. If we take into account three people mentioned above, they signify a profound change for the rest of the people and I would like to see Eric as a force that returns to Bon Temps to deliver such a change (it will not come from within, not with what we can see: Bill directing this town like a puppeteer). Remember, Eric is a son of Godric and has exposed Bill before; Bill is a false prophet, a quasi saviour, a known traitor and liar. The only force that can annihilate Bill is Eric.

In 5.03 we witness Eric and Bill meeting for the first time: ‘Bill: Who are you? Eric: Eric Northman. But to you, the true death.’

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ten_Commandments

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transfiguration_of_Jesus

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_of_the_Transfiguration

Notes:
  1. the-future-mrs-skarsgard reblogged this from hsm7
  2. osterby reblogged this from hsm7 and added:
    This follows the Christian allegory we that has been noted in the sub-text of True Blood....
  3. midnight828 reblogged this from hsm7
  4. allhailthevikinggod reblogged this from hsm7
  5. switchbladekiller reblogged this from hsm7 and added:
    One can only hope. At the same time, I find it hard to reconcile Eric just up and leaving his new progeny behind in the...
  6. dianeinfernal reblogged this from hsm7
  7. hsm7 reblogged this from ohiogurl
  8. ohiogurl reblogged this from heartsofwarriors and added:
    Yes, this is a good point. Mountaintops are where you go to meet with the divine and seek spiritual enlightenment....
  9. keepmeawayfromit reblogged this from stillhidden
  10. el-alma-es-eterna reblogged this from fuckyeahericnorthman
  11. askarsjustsoswedish reblogged this from justwandering-neverlost
  12. tbwillfuckwithurmind reblogged this from spuffyfeels and added:
    It makes sense that Eric would want to go home to Sweden and sit alone on a mountain and sunbathe and read a book...
  13. spuffyfeels reblogged this from stillhidden
  14. heartsofwarriors reblogged this from unreconstructedfangirl and added:
    Totally. Love this post, and I agree. Now that I’ve watched the finale again, I’m getting the sense the writers wanted...
  15. fuckyeahericnorthman reblogged this from mametupa
  16. biancadesu reblogged this from mametupa
  17. myloveskarsgard reblogged this from pbt1
  18. equinegifs reblogged this from pbt1 and added:
    love the thought but I think you’re giving the true blood writers too much credit
  19. kyung-sooni reblogged this from pbt1
  20. pbt1 reblogged this from stillhidden and added:
    Hallelujahs some one has seen the light. The God that comes will rise from the ashes. Our Phoenix will return once again...